Service animals fly for free on U.S. airlines but transporting the average dog or cat will cost a fee, up to hundreds of dollars. See the list below for specific prices by airline, plus pet transport restrictions such as unacceptable breeds and how extreme temperatures can ground a pet. Airlines Pet Policies and Pet Travel Fees Click on the airline name to see the carrier's pet policies (fees can... Continue reading
*2. Prices displayed based on purchase of a Roundtrip itinerary between HNL, OGG, LIH, KOA, ITO and BOS, JFK, SAN, SFO, SMF, LAX, LGB, PHX, OAK, SJC, LAS. Tickets must be booked between 4/12/2019 and 4/16/2019. Fares are available for travel on Mondays through Thursdays from 8/19/19 – 12/12/19. For travel from Hawaii to Las Vegas, NV fares are available for travel on Friday &ndash Wednesday from Hawaii and Tuesday – Friday to Hawaii from 8/19/19 – 12/12/19. For travel from Hawaii to Oakland, CA or San Jose, CA fares are available for travel on Mondays through Thursdays from 11/4/119 – 12/12/19 . Blackout Dates: 11/21/19 – 11/24/19 to Hawaii and 11/29/19 – 12/2/19 from Hawaii. Travel must be on Hawaiian Airlines operated flights only. Fares are not valid on codeshare flights and subject to 1 month maximum stay as measured from departure from fare origin. Fares may not be available over all dates and fares on some dates may be higher. The number of seats available in this fare class during the travel period shown are limited and may change at any time without notice. Fares include government taxes and fees and carrier fees. Fares are non-refundable, non-transferrable, and non-endorsable. Other restrictions apply. Additional baggage charges may apply.
Service animals fly for free on U.S. airlines but transporting the average dog or cat will cost a fee, up to hundreds of dollars. See the list below for specific prices by airline, plus pet transport restrictions such as unacceptable breeds and how extreme temperatures can ground a pet. Airlines Pet Policies and Pet Travel Fees Click on the airline name to see the carrier's pet policies (fees can... Continue reading

In February 2018, Hawaiian was rumored to be canceling its order for six A330-800s and replacing them with 787-9s.[82] It was reported that Boeing priced the aircraft at less than $115 million, and possibly less than $100 million, each; the production cost of a 787-9 is between $80 million and $90 million. Boeing Capital also released Hawaiian from three 767-300ER leases in advance; these aircraft were to be transferred to United Airlines. Initially, Hawaiian refuted it cancelled its A330-800 order, but did not dismiss a new deal with Boeing.[83] However, on March 6, 2018, Hawaiian Airlines confirmed the cancellation of the A330-800 order and the signing of a Letter of Intent with Boeing to purchase ten 787-9 aircraft, with options for an additional ten planes;[84] the deal was finalized at the Farnborough Air Show in July 2018.[85]


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Prices displayed based on purchase of a Roundtrip itinerary between SFO, OAK, SJC, SAN, LAX, LGB, SMF, BOS, PHX, JFK, LAS and HNL, OGG, KOA, LIH, ITO. Tickets must be booked between 4/12/2019 and 4/16/2019. Fares are available for travel Monday–Thursday between 8/19/2019 and 12/12/2019 and are only valid in the Economy (coach) cabin. Blackout Dates: 11/21/19 to 11/24/19 to Hawaii and 11/29/19 to 12/2/19 from Hawaii. Fares from Oakland, CA or San Jose, CA to Hawaii are available for travel Monday–Thursday from 11/4/2019 to 12/12/2019. Blackout Dates: 11/21/2019 to 11/24/2019 to Hawaii and 11/29/2019 to 12/2/2019 from Hawaii. Fares from Las Vegas, NV are available for travel Friday through Wednesday from Hawaii and Tuesday through Friday to Hawaii; from 8/19/2019 and 12/12/2019. Blackout Dates: 11/21/2019 to 11/24/2019 to Hawaii and 11/29/2019 to 12/2/2019 from Hawaii. Travel must be on Hawaiian Airlines operated flights only. Fares are not valid on codeshare flights and subject to 1 month maximum stay as measured from departure from fare origin. Fares may not be available over all dates and fares on some dates may be higher. The number of seats available in this fare class during the travel period shown are limited and may change at any time without notice. Fares include government taxes and fees and carrier fees. Fares are non-refundable, non-transferrable, and non-endorsable. Other restrictions apply. Additional baggage charges may apply.


Hawaiian provides complimentary and paid beverage service on all of its flights. Meals are not provided on interisland flights due to their short length (30–45 minutes). On its U.S. mainland flights, Hawaiian is one of the only major U.S. airlines to still provide complimentary meals in its main cabin (coach class); each meal is made with no preservatives, all-natural ingredients and packaged with recyclable materials.[94] In 2009, Hawaiian introduced premium meals in its main cabin, giving passengers the option of having the complimentary meal or paying to upgrade to a premium meal. The premium meals consisted of a variety of high end Asian cuisine, but were later discontinued.[94][95]
There are different types of travelers, and we’ve created some names for a few of them. Whether you’re a minimalist, budgeter, collector, storyteller, or germophobe, traveling is your game, right? But, which type of traveler are you? Think you know—well, take our personality test just to be sure . . . . Don’t forget to share your results (so your friends and family will know …
Heading into the 1990s, Hawaiian Airlines faced financial difficulties, racking up millions of dollars in losses throughout the previous three years. Due to the airline's increasingly unprofitable operations, it filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in September 1993. During this time, the company reduced many of its costs: reorganizing its debt, wrestling concessions from employees, cutting overcapacity, and streamlining its fleet by disposing many of the planes it had added to its fleet just a few years earlier.[24]
"In today's competitive world you cannot justify providing complimentary meals on a traditional business model. It simply does not pay for itself... which explains why essentially everybody has taken all that free food off the airplane. We're being illogical by actually investing heavily in this area... It's part of who we are, and it's what makes us different from everybody else."[99]

"In today's competitive world you cannot justify providing complimentary meals on a traditional business model. It simply does not pay for itself... which explains why essentially everybody has taken all that free food off the airplane. We're being illogical by actually investing heavily in this area... It's part of who we are, and it's what makes us different from everybody else."[99]
In February 2018, Hawaiian was rumored to be canceling its order for six A330-800s and replacing them with 787-9s.[82] It was reported that Boeing priced the aircraft at less than $115 million, and possibly less than $100 million, each; the production cost of a 787-9 is between $80 million and $90 million. Boeing Capital also released Hawaiian from three 767-300ER leases in advance; these aircraft were to be transferred to United Airlines. Initially, Hawaiian refuted it cancelled its A330-800 order, but did not dismiss a new deal with Boeing.[83] However, on March 6, 2018, Hawaiian Airlines confirmed the cancellation of the A330-800 order and the signing of a Letter of Intent with Boeing to purchase ten 787-9 aircraft, with options for an additional ten planes;[84] the deal was finalized at the Farnborough Air Show in July 2018.[85]
On May 4, 2006, Hawaiian Airlines expanded service between the US mainland and Hawaiʻi in anticipation of the induction of four additional Boeing 767-300 aircraft, primarily focused on expanding non-stop service to Kahului Airport from San Diego, Seattle, and Portland. Additional flights were also added between Honolulu and the cities of Sacramento, Seattle, and Los Angeles.
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