In March 2007, Hawaiian introduced a "tasting menu" or "tapas menu" for its first class passengers on its U.S. mainland and international flights. The menu consists of twenty entrees set on a rotation, with five available on any given flight. Passengers are provided information on the available entrees for their flight when they board, or shortly after takeoff and may choose up to three entrees as part of their inflight meal.[95][96]


Heading into the 1990s, Hawaiian Airlines faced financial difficulties, racking up millions of dollars in losses throughout the previous three years. Due to the airline's increasingly unprofitable operations, it filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in September 1993. During this time, the company reduced many of its costs: reorganizing its debt, wrestling concessions from employees, cutting overcapacity, and streamlining its fleet by disposing many of the planes it had added to its fleet just a few years earlier.[24]
Hawaiian Holdings revealed on July 17, 2012, that it had signed a Letter of Intent to acquire turboprop ATR 42 aircraft with the aim of establishing a subsidiary carrier to serve routes not currently in Hawaiian's neighbor island system.[69] In December 2012 it was announced that Empire Airlines would operate the aircraft on behalf of Hawaiian.[70] A fourth ATR 42 aircraft was acquired in June 2018.[71]
On February 16, 2010, Hawaiian Airlines sought approval from the U.S. Department of Transportation to begin nonstop flights from its hub at Honolulu to Tokyo-Haneda sometime in 2010. The airline was one of 5 US carriers — the others being Delta, Continental, United, and American — seeking approval to serve Haneda as part of the U.S.-Japan OpenSkies agreement.[33] Approval was granted from USDOT to begin nonstop service to Haneda, Japan. The flight began service on November 18, 2010.[34] In addition, the airline is planning to establish a codeshare agreement with All Nippon Airways.[35] On January 12, 2011, Hawaiian Airlines began nonstop service to Seoul-Incheon, South Korea.[36] On July 12, 2011, Hawaiian added Osaka, Japan to its network.[37]
Hawaiian began acquiring Boeing 717 aircraft for operation on the Neighbor Island network in February 2001.[67] On June 4, 2008, the airline announced that it had agreed to lease an additional four 717 airplanes to meet demand due to the shutdown of Aloha Airlines' passenger operations and the closing of ATA Airlines, with deliveries between September and the end of 2008.[68]

In August 2007, the Seattle Seahawks became the second sports team to begin using Hawaiian Airlines to travel to games. The Oakland Raiders, also of the NFL, have been flying Hawaiian Airlines since the 1990s. The two teams fly on Hawaiian's Boeing 767s to and from all their games. Two of Hawaiian's Boeing 767 aircraft have been fitted with decals of logos from the Seahawks and the Raiders.


Hawaiian Airlines serves destinations in several Asia-Pacific countries and territories. The airline added its sixth international destination, Incheon International Airport near Seoul, South Korea on January 12, 2011.[36] It also has daily and weekly direct, non-stop international flights from Honolulu to Tahiti, Australia, South Korea, Japan, and New Zealand.
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Hawaiian Airlines began to expand its footprint throughout the 1980s, as the result of intense competition on inter-island routes created by the entrance of Mid Pacific Air into the market. In 1985, the company began its first foray outside the inter-island market through charter services to the South Pacific and then throughout the rest of the Pacific using Douglas DC-8 aircraft. Despite the early successes of this new business, Hawaiian was forced to curtail its charter services when the Federal Government banned all DC-8 and B707 aircraft without hush kits from operating within the US. Hawaiian did, however, manage to gain a short exemption for its South Pacific services. 

Soon after, in early 1985, the company received the first two of its leased Lockheed L-1011 aircraft. One aircraft was used to launch Hawaiian's first scheduled operation out of Hawaiʻi, daily Honolulu-Los Angeles services. This new service put Hawaiian in direct competition with the major US air carriers for the first time in its history.[20] Throughout 1985 and 1986, Hawaiian Airlines added additional L-1011s to its fleet and used them to open up services to other West Coast gateway cities such as San Francisco, Seattle, Portland, Las Vegas, and Anchorage, which placed Hawaiian in further competition against the major US airlines.[21]
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Prices displayed based on purchase of a Roundtrip itinerary between SFO, OAK, SJC, SAN, LAX, LGB, SMF, BOS, PHX, JFK, LAS and HNL, OGG, KOA, LIH, ITO. Tickets must be booked between 4/12/2019 and 4/16/2019. Fares are available for travel Monday–Thursday between 8/19/2019 and 12/12/2019 and are only valid in the Economy (coach) cabin. Blackout Dates: 11/21/19 to 11/24/19 to Hawaii and 11/29/19 to 12/2/19 from Hawaii. Fares from Oakland, CA or San Jose, CA to Hawaii are available for travel Monday–Thursday from 11/4/2019 to 12/12/2019. Blackout Dates: 11/21/2019 to 11/24/2019 to Hawaii and 11/29/2019 to 12/2/2019 from Hawaii. Fares from Las Vegas, NV are available for travel Friday through Wednesday from Hawaii and Tuesday through Friday to Hawaii; from 8/19/2019 and 12/12/2019. Blackout Dates: 11/21/2019 to 11/24/2019 to Hawaii and 11/29/2019 to 12/2/2019 from Hawaii. Travel must be on Hawaiian Airlines operated flights only. Fares are not valid on codeshare flights and subject to 1 month maximum stay as measured from departure from fare origin. Fares may not be available over all dates and fares on some dates may be higher. The number of seats available in this fare class during the travel period shown are limited and may change at any time without notice. Fares include government taxes and fees and carrier fees. Fares are non-refundable, non-transferrable, and non-endorsable. Other restrictions apply. Additional baggage charges may apply.

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