In March 2003, Hawaiian Airlines filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection for the second time in its history. The airline continued its normal operations, and at the time was overdue for $4.5 million worth of payments to the pilots' pension plan. Within the company, it was suggested that the plan be terminated. As of May 2005, Hawaiian Airlines had received court approval of its reorganization plan. The company emerged from bankruptcy protection on June 2, 2005, with reduced operating costs through renegotiated contracts with its union work groups; restructured aircraft leases; and investment from RC Aviation, a unit of San Diego-based Ranch Capital, which bought a majority share in parent company Hawaiian Holdings Inc in 2004.
ʻOhana by Hawaiian is a regional subsidiary carrier of Hawaiian Airlines. The service is operated using three ATR 42 turboprop airplanes owned by Hawaiian and operated under contract by Empire Airlines. The new service was slated to begin in summer 2013 initially flying to Molokaʻi and Lānaʻi, however the airline was unable to begin during that period due to Federal Aviation Administration delays in certifying ʻOhana's operation.[56] ʻOhana by Hawaiian is fully integrated into the Hawaiian Airlines network.[44]
With airline service fees and baggage fees continuing to rise, cost-conscious consumers may want to check for updated fees before making a travel decision. Current bag fees for Hawaiian Airlines are listed below. If you need more info, your carrier's web site should have more detailed information. Additionally, all airlines traveling from, to, or within the United States are required to specify all baggage and special item charges at the time of passenger fare quote.

On February 16, 2010, Hawaiian Airlines sought approval from the U.S. Department of Transportation to begin nonstop flights from its hub at Honolulu to Tokyo-Haneda sometime in 2010. The airline was one of 5 US carriers — the others being Delta, Continental, United, and American — seeking approval to serve Haneda as part of the U.S.-Japan OpenSkies agreement.[33] Approval was granted from USDOT to begin nonstop service to Haneda, Japan. The flight began service on November 18, 2010.[34] In addition, the airline is planning to establish a codeshare agreement with All Nippon Airways.[35] On January 12, 2011, Hawaiian Airlines began nonstop service to Seoul-Incheon, South Korea.[36] On July 12, 2011, Hawaiian added Osaka, Japan to its network.[37]


Honolulu to Sydney Manila to Honolulu Seattle to Maui Honolulu to Maui Sydney to Honolulu Honolulu to Manila Los Angeles to Honolulu Seattle to Honolulu Honolulu to Las Vegas Honolulu to Los Angeles Maui to Honolulu Las Vegas to Honolulu Maui to Las Vegas Phoenix to Honolulu San Diego to Honolulu Honolulu to Seattle Honolulu to San Francisco Honolulu to Phoenix Honolulu to San Diego San Francisco to Honolulu
Honolulu to Sydney Manila to Honolulu Seattle to Maui Honolulu to Maui Sydney to Honolulu Honolulu to Manila Los Angeles to Honolulu Seattle to Honolulu Honolulu to Las Vegas Honolulu to Los Angeles Maui to Honolulu Las Vegas to Honolulu Maui to Las Vegas Phoenix to Honolulu San Diego to Honolulu Honolulu to Seattle Honolulu to San Francisco Honolulu to Phoenix Honolulu to San Diego San Francisco to Honolulu
NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Void where prohibited. Open to legal residents of the U.S., and are at least 18 years old or age of majority, as of date of entry. Sweepstakes Period begins 8:00 a.m. HST on 4/4/19 and ends 11:59 p.m. HST on 4/25/19. For complete Official Rules and eligibility, visit HawaiianAirlines.com/OfficialRules. Sponsor: Hawaiian Airlines, Inc.

To replace its retired DC-8s and L-1011s, Hawaiian Airlines leased six DC-10s from American Airlines, who continued to provide maintenance on the aircraft. An agreement with American also included participation in American's SABRE reservation system and participation in American Airlines' AAdvantage frequent flyer program.[25] The DC-10s were subsequently retired between 2002 and 2003.[10] The company replaced these leased DC-10s with 14 leased Boeing 767 aircraft during a fleet modernization program that also replaced its DC-9s with new Boeing 717 aircraft. The Boeing aircraft featured an updated rendition of the company's "Pualani" tail art, which had appeared on its Douglas aircraft since the 1970s.


Hawaiian Airlines began to expand its footprint throughout the 1980s, as the result of intense competition on inter-island routes created by the entrance of Mid Pacific Air into the market. In 1985, the company began its first foray outside the inter-island market through charter services to the South Pacific and then throughout the rest of the Pacific using Douglas DC-8 aircraft. Despite the early successes of this new business, Hawaiian was forced to curtail its charter services when the Federal Government banned all DC-8 and B707 aircraft without hush kits from operating within the US. Hawaiian did, however, manage to gain a short exemption for its South Pacific services.
1. excursion, tour, jaunt, junket. Trip, expedition, journey, pilgrimage, voyage are terms for a course of travel made to a particular place, usually for some specific purpose. Trip is the general word, indicating going any distance and returning, by walking or any means of locomotion, for either business or pleasure, and in either a hurried or a leisurely manner: a trip to Europe; a vacation trip; a bus trip. An expedition, made often by an organized company, is designed to accomplish a specific purpose: an archaeological expedition. Journey indicates a trip of considerable length, wholly or mainly by land, for business or pleasure or other reasons, and is now applied to travel that is more leisurely or more fatiguing than a trip; a return is not necessarily indicated: the long journey to Tibet. A pilgrimage is made as to a shrine, from motives of piety or veneration: a pilgrimage to Lourdes. A voyage is travel by water or air, usually for a long distance and for business or pleasure; if by water, leisure is indicated: a voyage around the world. 7. lapse, oversight. 14. bungle, blunder, err.

Starting December 1, 2017, guests in the main cabin on Hawaiian flights between Hawaiʻi and Western U.S. gateway cities will be treated to complimentary meal service exclusively created for the airline’s new Pau Hāna Café brand. The Pau Hāna Café, branded meals made exclusively for the airline, consists of a continental breakfast box for brunch and hot sandwich and side for lunch. Pau Hāna, a Hawaiian term for “finished work,” is a time to relax and unwind after a long workday.[97] The meal service will be followed by coffee and a sweet treat for dessert. A parting Mahalo service features the carrier’s popular Kōloa Breeze cocktail, featuring Kōloa Rum from the Island of Kauaʻi, and the airline's signature Pau Hāna snack mix.
Hawaiian Airlines serves destinations in several Asia-Pacific countries and territories. The airline added its sixth international destination, Incheon International Airport near Seoul, South Korea on January 12, 2011.[36] It also has daily and weekly direct, non-stop international flights from Honolulu to Tahiti, Australia, South Korea, Japan, and New Zealand.
Whoever you are, whatever you're looking for, we have the perfect place for you. Our 28,397,241 listings include 5,797,428 listings of homes, apartments, and other unique places to stay, and are located in 148,102 destinations in 228 countries and territories. Booking.com B.V. is based in Amsterdam, the Netherlands and is supported internationally by 198 offices in 70 countries.

On February 16, 2010, Hawaiian Airlines sought approval from the U.S. Department of Transportation to begin nonstop flights from its hub at Honolulu to Tokyo-Haneda sometime in 2010. The airline was one of 5 US carriers — the others being Delta, Continental, United, and American — seeking approval to serve Haneda as part of the U.S.-Japan OpenSkies agreement.[33] Approval was granted from USDOT to begin nonstop service to Haneda, Japan. The flight began service on November 18, 2010.[34] In addition, the airline is planning to establish a codeshare agreement with All Nippon Airways.[35] On January 12, 2011, Hawaiian Airlines began nonstop service to Seoul-Incheon, South Korea.[36] On July 12, 2011, Hawaiian added Osaka, Japan to its network.[37] 

Hawaiian Airlines (Hawaiian: Hui Mokulele ʻo Hawaiʻi)[5][6] is the flag carrier and the largest airline in the U.S. state of Hawaii. It is the tenth-largest commercial airline in the US, and is based in Honolulu, Hawaii.[7][8] The airline operates its main hub at Daniel K. Inouye International Airport on the island of Oʻahu and a secondary hub out of Kahului Airport on the island of Maui.[2] Hawaiian Airlines operates flights to Asia, American Samoa, Australia, Hawaii, New Zealand, and the United States mainland. Hawaiian Airlines is owned by Hawaiian Holdings, Inc. of which Peter R. Ingram is the current President and Chief Executive Officer.[9]
Hawaiian Airlines (Hawaiian: Hui Mokulele ʻo Hawaiʻi)[5][6] is the flag carrier and the largest airline in the U.S. state of Hawaii. It is the tenth-largest commercial airline in the US, and is based in Honolulu, Hawaii.[7][8] The airline operates its main hub at Daniel K. Inouye International Airport on the island of Oʻahu and a secondary hub out of Kahului Airport on the island of Maui.[2] Hawaiian Airlines operates flights to Asia, American Samoa, Australia, Hawaii, New Zealand, and the United States mainland. Hawaiian Airlines is owned by Hawaiian Holdings, Inc. of which Peter R. Ingram is the current President and Chief Executive Officer.[9]
Soon after, in early 1985, the company received the first two of its leased Lockheed L-1011 aircraft. One aircraft was used to launch Hawaiian's first scheduled operation out of Hawaiʻi, daily Honolulu-Los Angeles services. This new service put Hawaiian in direct competition with the major US air carriers for the first time in its history.[20] Throughout 1985 and 1986, Hawaiian Airlines added additional L-1011s to its fleet and used them to open up services to other West Coast gateway cities such as San Francisco, Seattle, Portland, Las Vegas, and Anchorage, which placed Hawaiian in further competition against the major US airlines.[21]
To replace its retired DC-8s and L-1011s, Hawaiian Airlines leased six DC-10s from American Airlines, who continued to provide maintenance on the aircraft. An agreement with American also included participation in American's SABRE reservation system and participation in American Airlines' AAdvantage frequent flyer program.[25] The DC-10s were subsequently retired between 2002 and 2003.[10] The company replaced these leased DC-10s with 14 leased Boeing 767 aircraft during a fleet modernization program that also replaced its DC-9s with new Boeing 717 aircraft. The Boeing aircraft featured an updated rendition of the company's "Pualani" tail art, which had appeared on its Douglas aircraft since the 1970s.
During the 1980s, Hawaiian also embarked on the development and construction of Kapalua Airport on west side of Maui. Opened in 1987, the airport was designed with a 3,000-foot runway, which constrained its ability to handle large aircraft.[23] As a result, when the airport first opened, Hawaiian Airlines was the only inter-island carrier with aircraft capable of serving the airport. With its de Havilland Canada DHC-7 Dash 7 turboprops, Hawaiian had a distinct competitive advantage in the Maui market.[20][21]
NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Void where prohibited. Open to legal residents of the U.S., and are at least 18 years old or age of majority, as of date of entry. Sweepstakes Period begins 8:00 a.m. HST on 4/4/19 and ends 11:59 p.m. HST on 4/25/19. For complete Official Rules and eligibility, visit HawaiianAirlines.com/OfficialRules. Sponsor: Hawaiian Airlines, Inc.
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